Last Update: July 12, 2020 - 11:00 pm
Last Update: March 18, 2019 - 2:30 pm
Last Update: July 12, 2020 - 11:00 pm
Last Update: July 12, 2020 - 11:00 pm
Manchester City v Uefa: a tangled tale about to reach its final verdict | David Conn
Manchester City v Uefa: a tangled tale about to reach its final verdict | David Conn

On Monday the court of arbitration for sport will announce its verdict on the club’s appeal against their two-year Champions League ban

Manchester City are due to hear on Monday whether their two-year ban from the Champions League for a serious breach of Uefa’s financial fair play rules has been upheld or overturned, following their appeal to the court of arbitration for sport. On Friday Cas announced the verdict would be released at 9.30am BST.

City’s hierarchy have throughout vehemently and vitriolically contested the finding of Uefa’s club financial control body’s “adjudicatory chamber” that they committed a serious breach of FFP rules by overstating sponsorships from Abu Dhabi companies.

Continue reading...

Jofra Archer proves his point but Jermaine Blackwood has the last laugh | Andy Bull
Jofra Archer proves his point but Jermaine Blackwood has the last laugh | Andy Bull

The fast bowler, goaded by Tino Best, produced a superb spell for England but Blackwood made a telling point of his own

Jofra Archer was in the mood. You could see it in his batting early on Sunday morning. Crack! He lashed Jason Holder through long-off. Smack! He thrashed Shannon Gabriel through midwicket. Archer has always been able to hit them, but this was a little different to anything he’d done for England before. Here he was playing senior partner to the other two batsmen, Mark Wood and Jimmy Anderson, both older and more experienced than him. He was dictating how they were going to go about it, telling them which singles to take and which to turn down. When Gabriel got him out, caught behind, Archer stared into the distance, obviously furious.

Related: West Indies hold on for famous win over England after dramatic first Test

Continue reading...

Stokes says he understands Root's sleepless nights after loss to West Indies
Manu Tuilagi set to move to Sale and keep England career alive
Manu Tuilagi set to move to Sale and keep England career alive

  • Centre to link up with Van Rensburg and bolster Sale title push
  • Tuilagi leaves Leicester after refusing to accept pay cut

Manu Tuilagi is set to keep his England career alive with a move to Sale after his acrimonious departure from Leicester. The 29-year-old’s exit from Welford Road was confirmed on Friday and he is expected to sign for Sale this coming week, the Observer understands.

Tuilagi had been linked with a lucrative move abroad after refusing to accept a cut to his £500,000-a-year salary but he was determined to stay in the Premiership and remain eligible for England. The Sale director of rugby, Steve Diamond, denied talks with the centre this past week but did confirm the Sharks were one of few clubs that had room for Tuilagi within the salary cap.

Continue reading...

José Mourinho wins but derby leaves fog of confusion over north London | Jonathan Wilson
José Mourinho wins but derby leaves fog of confusion over north London | Jonathan Wilson

Key questions about both sides’ forwards went unanswered in a game where Spurs and Arsenal showed their flaws

After all the optimistic talk, the north-London derby was a sobering reminder for Arsenal of just how much still needs to be done, just how pervasive are the problems Mikel Arteta inherited. And while the victory lifted Tottenham above Arsenal, and for all this in some respects resembled a classic José Mourinho mugging, it was a result that did little to clear the doubts about the manager and his approach.

Spurs won because their defence were less chaotic than Arsenal’s but the picture, really, was of two attacks seeking an identity. At least it was possible to discern a Tottenham attack, which wasn’t the case against Everton or Bournemouth.

Continue reading...

Jack Charlton: a footballing giant who was forever a man of the people | Kevin Mitchell
Jack Charlton: a footballing giant who was forever a man of the people | Kevin Mitchell

The World Cup winner went down the pit at 15 and was loved unconditionally for his impish wit and unbounded generosity

He was Ireland’s favourite Englishman. He was Leeds’s favourite Geordie. And, with due respect to his illustrious brother, Jack was nearly everyone’s favourite Charlton. On Friday night at home in Northumberland, Jack Charlton died in his sleep at 85 in the embrace of his family after suffering for more than a year with lymphoma and dementia. The outpouring of affection for him in the hours since has been as rich with anecdotes of laughter and mischief as for his deeds in football.

Charlton is remembered largely for his part in England’s World Cup victory in 1966, 23 years at Leeds and taking Ireland to two World Cup finals. There were successful spells of management, too, at Middlesbrough (where he was manager of the year in 1974), and Sheffield Wednesday, whom he rescued from ignominy, and Newcastle, where he and a young Paul Gascoigne worked together for a short time.

Continue reading...

Ebony Rainford-Brent and Michael Holding on experiences of racism – video
Ebony Rainford-Brent and Michael Holding on experiences of racism – video

The former professional cricketers Ebony Rainford-Brent and Michael Holding have shared their experiences of racism in the sport in a video broadcast by Sky Sports during the first day of England's Test match with the West Indies.  

The broadcaster Rainford-Brent emotionally talked about the racism she has experienced within cricket. 'I love the game, I think it has so much more to offer,' she said. 'But it can be really difficult dealing with that day-in-day-out.' 

Michael Holding, the former West Indies fast bowler and Sky Sports commentator, also shared his thoughts on the barriers black people face both in sport and society, and spoke about the importance of Black Lives Matter movement. 

Continue reading...

Milan's thrilling win over Juve shows Pioli will be a hard act to follow | Nicky Bandini
Milan's thrilling win over Juve shows Pioli will be a hard act to follow | Nicky Bandini

Ralf Rangnick will replace him next season but Stefano Pioli has been so effective fans feel he is deserving of a longer run

Stefano Pioli woke up on Tuesday morning to another round of headlines about the man who is being hired to replace him. After months of courtship, Ralf Rangnick is understood to have agreed a deal to become Milan’s manager next season. The story was front-page news for Italy’s best-read newspaper, Gazzetta dello Sport, with a picture of the German underneath the words “It’s Done”.

There remains some ambiguity about what that means for Pioli. Gazzetta speculated he could be given a temporary role alongside Rangnick, who has worked more as a director than a manager over the past eight years – first at RB Leipzig and, more recently, in an overarching role across Red Bull’s football empire. Yet while Rangnick is expected to shape Milan’s transfer policy, all indications are he intends to coach the first team too.

Continue reading...

The Fiver | New normals featuring ruffled former Football Weekly panellists
The Fiver | New normals featuring ruffled former Football Weekly panellists

Sign up now! Sign up now! Sign up now? Sign up now!

In the depths of lockdown, The Fiver attempted to better itself. There was a three-month self-imposed Tin ban, now long forgotten amid a blizzard of park-bench swilling not seen since the days The Fiver was a fan of The Levellers. The front garden at Fiver Towers was set for the Capability Brown treatment and yet long weeds grow among cigarette dimps and discarded Frazzles packets. Inside, box-fresh copies of Philip Roth and Dostoevsky lie unthumbed on the shelf, as the complete works of Jeffrey Archer have been devoured as comfort reading.

And an attempt to become better versed in statistics amid the barrage of log files and seven-day averages of Covid-19 has also failed. Standard deviation is still what Weird Uncle Fiver gets up to of an evening. The grey matter is not what it was way back in those happy, carefree days of February when the world’s biggest worry was how Nigel Pearson might get on at Watford. It may not just be The Fiver whose senses are dulled. The Big Cup and Big Vase tombola on Friday was a shambolic affair to suggest that any new normals are going to feature panicked, disorganised chaos. Even smooth-talking erstwhile Football Weekly panellist Pedro Pinto looked ruffled as a series of video links crashed, and various Euro football club bigwigs defied social distancing guidelines in those brief moments when Zoom was actually working properly.

Continue reading...

Barcelona after Lionel Messi, Juventus and José Mourinho – Football Weekly
Barcelona after Lionel Messi, Juventus and José Mourinho – Football Weekly

Max Rushden, Barry Glendenning, Sid Lowe and Nicky Bandini discuss the future for Barcelona and Lionel Messi and Juventus as they edge closer to another title in Italy. Plus, Archie Rhind-Tutt talks about how Bayern Munich secured another trophy at the weekend

Join the conversation on Facebook, Twitter and email.

Max speaks to Sid Lowe about all the latest developments in La Liga, as Real Madrid close in on the Spanish title at Barcelona’s expense. This is followed by a discussion on the future for the Catalan club and Lionel Messi, as they start to plan for life after the Argentinian.

In part two we get Nicky Bandini’s view on Italy, as Juventus edge closer to another Serie A title, and also speaks to Archie Rhind-Tutt to get the lowdown on Bayern Munich’s German Cup victory over Bayer Leverkusen at the weekend.

In the final part the pod talks about José Mourinho, following Tottenham’s unimpressive win over Everton and a quick run-down of the League One play-off semi-finals.

Continue reading...

The Fiver | A sequence the untrained eye could easily mistake for a dirty protest
The Fiver | A sequence the untrained eye could easily mistake for a dirty protest

Sign up now! Sign up now! Sign up now? Sign up now!

It’s fair to say that the fortunes of former Old Firm managers looking to branch out into English football have been ever so slightly mixed. Take some of the lads from the Pope’s Newc O’Rangers. Dick Advocaat saved Sunderland from relegation in 2015, but back in the day everybody used to do that. Alex McLeish won Birmingham’s first proper trophy for nearly half a century, only to spoil the effect by joining the Villa and alienating absolutely everyone in the UK’s second-biggest city. Walter Smith nearly got Everton relegated for the first time in 50 years, while across the city Graeme Souness systematically destroyed the most successful club in the country. Oops-a-daisy, one and all.

Continue reading...

Mason Greenwood and the Manchester United renaissance – Football Weekly
Mason Greenwood and the Manchester United renaissance – Football Weekly

Max Rushden is joined by Barry Glendenning, Jacqui Oatley and John Brewin to discuss young English strikers making an impact over the weekend, and Jamie Vardy’s incredible 100 Premier League goals

Rate, review, share on Apple Podcasts, Soundcloud, Audioboom, Mixcloud, Acast and Stitcher, and join the conversation on Facebook, Twitter and email.

Max Rushden is joined by Barry Glendenning, Jacqui Oatley and John Brewin to discuss young English strikers making an impact over the weekend, and Jamie Vardy’s incredible 100 Premier League goals after a late start. And we look at the Championship, where there have been manager sackings, hat-tricks, and sarcastic police tweets.

Continue reading...

Adored like Ali: why Roger Federer is the champion of the world – in a tiebreak | Kevin Mitchell
Adored like Ali: why Roger Federer is the champion of the world – in a tiebreak | Kevin Mitchell

Nadal and Djokovic have plausible claims to be the greatest of the past 50 years but their serene, ruthless rival aces it for me

Few rivalries in sport divide fans with quite the fervour and wilful lack of understanding for an opposing point of view as does that involving Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic.

When those whose recall reaches back beyond the start of the millennium to weigh up the merits of Pete Sampras and Björn Borg as the other contenders in a magnificent top five, the battalions of young social media hawks smile upon them as quaintly romantic, with their love of wooden rackets, tight shorts and bad mullets. As great as those two players were, with 25 majors between them, they are regarded as intruders on a private argument.

Continue reading...

Trump wanted to 'Kaepernick' Bubba Wallace. Instead he made him too big to fail
Trump wanted to 'Kaepernick' Bubba Wallace. Instead he made him too big to fail

The president’s baseless attack on Nascar’s only Black driver strengthened the athlete rather than weaken him

More than 130,000 Americans have died from coronavirus. Double-digit unemployment plunges the economy ever closer toward depression. All the while the police continue to kill unarmed Black people with impunity, sparking demonstrations across the country. Any one of these legacy-defining crises would consume the average American president. For Donald Trump, somehow, there is an even more pressing agenda item: wrecking the racing career of Nascar’s Bubba Wallace.

The bashing began on Monday with Trump wondering on Twitter whether Wallace – whose status as Nascar’s only top-level Black driver came into sharp relief after a noose was discovered in his team garage a little more than a week after he successfully called on his Southern-fried sport to ban the Confederate flag – had “apologized to all those great Nascar drivers & officials who came to his aid, stood by his side, & were willing to sacrifice everything for him, only to find out that the whole thing was just another HOAX?”

Continue reading...