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Last Update: July 16, 2019 - 1:00 pm
Benefits of victory will disappear once England go back behind paywall | Matthew Engel
Benefits of victory will disappear once England go back behind paywall | Matthew Engel

Clashes with other events and changes in domestic structure mean cricket’s attempts to reclaim its territory will be resisted

An hour after the midsummer madness finished at Lord’s on Sunday night the phone rang. One of our relatives in Yorkshire had something to say. “I couldn’t handle the tension,” announced nine-year-old Amos. “Really, I just wanted it to be over. My hands were so sweaty.” He did not say this as though it were a bad thing. He said it with the zeal of a convert.

“So if someone in the playground tomorrow says: ‘Let’s play cricket,’ would you go for it?” I asked. He thought for a moment. “Yeah. Think I would.”

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Silverstone shows its class with a little help from sensible stewarding | Giles Richards
Silverstone shows its class with a little help from sensible stewarding | Giles Richards

The track drew praise from several drivers after Sunday’s British GP for encouraging competitive racing and it also benefited from the stewards allowing hard but fair racing

With the signing of a new contract to host F1 for a further five years there was a celebratory air at Silverstone. That F1 had done the right thing was confirmed in spades on Sunday, when the old airfield delivered a marvellous race. The drivers revelled in it and the opportunity for genuine racing it affords. F1’s problems in following closely have not gone away but they are negated on good tracks. Silverstone’s layout encourages a fight and several of the corner sequences give drivers the chance to come back during an attempted pass which makes for compelling action. The previous race at Austria similarly facilitated proper racing. It is no coincidence these tracks repeatedly host a great spectacle. The three men on the podium – Lewis Hamilton, Valtteri Bottas and Charles Leclerc – were all in agreement: it was the circuits making the difference. Bottas was unusually and pleasingly blunt in identifying F1’s real problem. “It’s all about selection of the tracks,” he said. “I’m sure many of the track selections for the calendar are just pure political reasons and money, rather than focusing on whether it’s good for racing or not.”

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Talking Horses: it seems astonishing that Arc weekend runs at a loss
Talking Horses: it seems astonishing that Arc weekend runs at a loss

The size of the loss has not been revealed, but Arc weekend was in the red in 2018, despite an eye-watering admission price hike

French racing’s senior executives are clearly hard at work before October’s Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe and briefed reporters at Longchamp for Sunday’s Grand Prix de Paris on their plans to avoid a repeat of the PR disaster when the track hosted its first Arc since 2015 last autumn. But while they were doing their best to woo the British and Irish fans who were bitterly disappointed by their experience in 2018, they also revealed what seems to be – to me, at least – an astonishing fact about the showpiece event of European racing. Arc weekend, which includes the only day of the entire season when Longchamp is full to the rafters, runs at a loss.

You read that correctly. A loss. If Edward Gillespie, the man who turned the Cheltenham Festival into one of sport’s biggest events, happens to be reading this piece, his eyebrows have just hit the ceiling.

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County cricket: Yorkshire v Somerset, Essex v Warwickshire and more – live!
County cricket: Yorkshire v Somerset, Essex v Warwickshire and more – live!

Glamorgan could only last an hour and a half this morning in what was always going to be a near-impossible task. The reborn Toby Roland Jones finished with five for 68 - and ten wickets in the match - and Mr Boom-Boom de Lange was stranded on 45. It was Glamorgan’s first defeat of the season, but they remain second in the table.

I never imagined Jack Russell and Twitter...

Could spend the rest of my life watching this https://t.co/VlpjZ9yKZs

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Emery says Arsenal and Koscielny 'need to speak' as Martinelli scores on debut
Emery says Arsenal and Koscielny 'need to speak' as Martinelli scores on debut

  • We’re playing with the spirit to create a new way, says manager
  • Martinelli, Saka and Olayinka score in win over Colorado Rapids

The Arsenal manager, Unai Emery, has said he is awaiting a decision on Laurent Koscielny after the captain refused to travel with the squad for their pre-season tour to the United States but added the Premier League club must “keep moving ahead” regardless.

The 33-year-old French centre back, who has a year remaining on his contract, has been linked with a switch to the Ligue 1 clubs Bordeaux and Lyon.

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Diversity is one of our strengths and it helped us win the World Cup | Moeen Ali
Diversity is one of our strengths and it helped us win the World Cup | Moeen Ali

In the England dressing room it does not matter where you come from or what you believe in if you show courage, unity and respect

The moment we won the World Cup is one I will never forget and would do anything just to experience again. It was the most euphoric sporting sensation you could possibly imagine.

I was sat in the dugout, roughly at third man, as the throw came in from Jason Roy. In that split second I knew Jos Buttler would take the ball cleanly, I knew that Martin Guptill was short of his ground and from there, with the stumps demolished, I knew it would be total carnage.

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Ben Stokes writes his redemption story with World Cup tour de force
Ben Stokes writes his redemption story with World Cup tour de force

The all-rounder’s remarkable performances during the tournament, capped by a bravura display in the final, suggest Stokes 3.0 could be the best iteration of all

Ben Stokes: remember the name. This World Cup was always billed as a moment to refresh and start over, a chance to straighten the mistakes of the recent past. It is a process that works on the micro as well as the macro level.

For a long time Sunday’s final at Lord’s was an occasion looking for a shape to fit, a genre to follow. As England restricted New Zealand’s batsmen it must have felt for the home crowd like a summer comedy, a jaunt destined for the inevitable happy ending. As England fumbled and stalled in mid-afternoon it seemed like something else: a saga, an epic, perhaps even, as wickets began to fall, a horror story.

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Hangovers, smiles and screaming kids: England’s odd Oval party | Andy Bull
Hangovers, smiles and screaming kids: England’s odd Oval party | Andy Bull

England’s gathering at the Oval seemed a fairly subdued and chaotic way to celebrate one of the great sporting achievements but, silly as it all was, it felt sweet and fitting too

People have all sorts of ideas about the best way to tackle a bad hangover: cold showers, carbohydrates, coffee, perhaps a good cooked breakfast or a turn in the fresh air. One thing no one has ever recommended, though, is the remedy the ECB concocted for their World Cup-winning team, which involved a meet-and-greet with hundreds of screaming primary‑school children on the outfield at the Oval, a round of press and TV interviews and then, to cap it all off, a swift hair-of-the-dog with Theresa May at No 10 Downing Street. Watching the players come stumbling downstairs from the dressing room at 11 in the morning, the drinkers among them conspicuous by their sunglasses, it looked less like a party than it did a punishment.

When Sri Lanka won the World Cup in 1996 their captain, Arjuna Ranatunga, lost the cheque he had just been presented with at the victory ceremony because someone pickpocketed it from him during the pitch invasion. This time one wondered, for a minute, whether Eoin Morgan was going to lose the World Cup trophy when he disappeared beneath a wave of over‑excited schoolchildren, who started climbing all over him, and each other, to get at it. At one point one of the bigger kids seemed to have wrenched the cup away from him, before someone wisely decided that maybe they should hurry the thing back indoors again.

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Epic final defines a triumphant World Cup but will it spark a cricket revival? | Vic Marks
Epic final defines a triumphant World Cup but will it spark a cricket revival? | Vic Marks

England have the spoils, to New Zealand goes the glory and the nation has a chance to fall back in love with cricket again

It is a phrase that is usually painfully glib or laden with irony but for once it may be appropriate: perhaps cricket really was the winner. The audience beyond, thankfully enlarged, as well as those crammed into every nook and cranny of Lord’s, watched a melodrama that left everyone gasping. Spectators eventually filed out of the old ground stunned by what they had just witnessed, enthralled and exhausted.

The last hour at Lord’s was complicated, yet there seemed to be women and children present who found it utterly captivating. The result may not have been just but that is often the nature of sport. The ricochet from Ben Stokes’s bat in the final over of the longer match was a freak occurrence, a deus ex machina that no self‑respecting playwright would dare to introduce. Never have I seen that happen with the game on a knife-edge. Without those four extra runs England would have needed seven to win, six to tie, from two balls: not impossible but not very likely.

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Simona Halep sets sights on Olympics after fulfilling Wimbledon dream
Simona Halep sets sights on Olympics after fulfilling Wimbledon dream

The women’s champion aims to use her emphatic victory over Serena Williams as a springboard for further success, with 2020 Olympics in Tokyo a major goal

Shortly after her stunning victory over Serena Williams in the Wimbledon final on Saturday, Simona Halep made her way to the players’ lawn, the area at the All England Club where families, team members and friends often congregate after a match. Sometimes the champion chooses to enjoy the moment in private but Halep marched straight into the middle of the lawn and spent the next hour receiving congratulations from anyone and everyone. It is hard to think of a more popular champion or one who has worked harder to earn it.

Related: Simona Halep’s show of power and belief helps her realise Wimbledon dream | Sean Ingle

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‘I had no time for emotions’: Halep on her fearless defeat of Williams
‘I had no time for emotions’: Halep on her fearless defeat of Williams

The Romanian took less than an hour to demolish the seven-times Wimbledon champion. But we shouldn’t write off Williams just yet

Last month, Simona Halep was asked what she thought when the word “grass” came up. She replied: “Picnics.” Now the 27-year-old Romanian is Wimbledon singles champion, having obliterated Serena Williams 6-2, 6-2 in less than an hour on centre court. It was a ruthless, near-perfect exhibition of grass-court tennis, and a brutal, confounding and at times poignant defeat for Williams, a seven-times winner here.

As Halep clutched the Venus Rosewater Dish to her chest, there was an obvious question: had she ever played better? “Never,” she beamed. “It was the best match. I had nerves. My stomach was not very well before the match. But I had no time for emotions.”

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A golden sporting Sunday to make Britain appreciate its better self | Richard Williams
A golden sporting Sunday to make Britain appreciate its better self | Richard Williams

Whether at Lord’s, Wimbledon or Silverstone or just delirious in the back garden here was a day to rekindle the Olympic spirit of 2012 and forget the decision that has divided us since

Bread and circuses, eh? A full house of 140,000 at Silverstone, Wimbledon packed for the men’s final, the entire nation taking advantage of the free-to-air concession to follow the twists and turns of an unprecedented cricket showdown at a sold-out Lord’s. Who, we asked ourselves, does this stuff better? And yet amid the unfolding delirium of Sunday’s sporting cavalcade there were moments when it was impossible not to pause the action and ask what it means, in the times through which we are living, to find a few hours’ relief by cheering a bunch of talented people hitting a ball or driving round in circles.

Related: Epic final defines a triumphant World Cup – will it spark a cricket revival? | Vic Marks

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The Fiver | Brucey is gannin yem, man!
The Fiver | Brucey is gannin yem, man!

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As a player, Steve Bruce would put his face where the less courageous would not dare waft their boot. He wore the scars with pride. Similar has gone for his managerial career. With his 10th job as a boss set to be working with Magic Mike Ashley at Newcastle, football’s Bernard Cribbins doppelganger will be taking on a role that many have winced at. “Never go back,” Sam Allardyce said last week, even though his last Tyneside tenure and resultant redundo payment paid for that Casa St James bolthole on the Costa Blanca.

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England and New Zealand fans and players react to momentous Cricket World Cup final – video
England and New Zealand fans and players react to momentous Cricket World Cup final – video

'I've hugged and kissed people I have never met before today,' one jubilant fan says after the dramatic World Cup final in which England tied with New Zealand in the regular game and the super over, winning only through virtue of having more boundaries. 'You know I thought we were dead and buried,' England's opening bowler Chris Woakes says. 'We tied somehow and a super over in a final, a World Cup final, it's incredible.' New Zealand fans agree it was an incredible game but not all are satisfied with the outcome. 'I don't want to be bitter,' said one. 'It seems like sharing the trophy would be the right result'

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England's 'rollercoaster' journey to Cricket World Cup glory – video
England's 'rollercoaster' journey to Cricket World Cup glory – video

England have won their first ever World Cup, overcoming New Zealand at Lord's in extraordinary fashion. Watch the video to relive their 'rollercoaster' journey through the tournament to ultimate triumph

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England beat New Zealand in Lord's epic to win their first Cricket World Cup – video report
England beat New Zealand in Lord's epic to win their first Cricket World Cup – video report

England have won their first ever World Cup, overcoming New Zealand at Lord's in extraordinary fashion. 

The game went to a super over after it was tied, but not even that could separate the teams.

Eoin Morgan's men won via 'boundaries struck' after two innings and the super over failed to settle the epic encounter. 

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Sports quiz of the week: Cori Gauff, Antoine Griezmann and Calypso Girls
Sports quiz of the week: Cori Gauff, Antoine Griezmann and Calypso Girls

Who won early? Who beat England? Who earned what?

In which European capital city did the Tour de France begin this week?

Oslo

Brussels

Paris

Andorra la Vella

England and New Zealand will meet in the Cricket World Cup final at Lord’s on Sunday. Which of them has won the trophy before?

England

New Zealand

Neither of them

Both of them

Who did England lose to the last time they reached the final, in 1992?

West Indies

Australia

Pakistan

India

Roger Federer is in the mix to win his ninth Wimbledon title this year. What did the people of Switzerland give him after he won his first in 2003?

A massive bar of chocolate

A cow called Juliette

A lighthouse beside Lake Geneva

His body weight in beer

Coco Gauff lit up Wimbledon this year, making it to the fourth round of the women’s singles at the age of 15. Who won a Wimbledon women’s doubles title at 15?

Serena Williams

Martina Hingis

Anna Kournikova

Steffi Graf

Peter Crouch has retired from football at the age of 38. Crouch had an impressive record for England, scoring 22 goals in his 42 appearances. He hit his only international hat-trick against Jamaica in 2006. What else did he do in that game?

Was given a straight red card

Scored an own goal

Missed a penalty

Was given two yellow cards – both for taking off his shirt

What record does Crouch hold?

He won more England caps as a substitute than any other player

He has scored the most headed goals in the Premier League

He is the oldest player to have played in the Premier League

He has played for more clubs in the Premier League than anyone else

In which tournament are the Sunshine Girls, She-Cranes, Bajan Gems, Calypso Girls, Roses, Warriors and Thistles competing this weekend in Liverpool?

Women’s Rugby League World Cup

Netball World Cup

Baseball European Championship

Women’s Cricket World Cup

The world’s best golfers will be arriving in Northern Ireland this weekend to compete at the Open Championship. The tournament is returning to Royal Portrush golf course for the first time since 1951. The winner is now awarded £1.5m. What was the prize money for the champion back in 1951?

£150

£300

£1,951

£50,000

Antoine Griezmann has joined Barcelona for €120m. Which club did he play for before Atlético Madrid?

Marseille

Real Sociedad

Paris Saint-Germain

Porto

1 and above.

Oh dear. Have a great weekend

2 and above.

Oh dear. Have a great weekend

3 and above.

Oh dear. Have a great weekend

4 and above.

That's respectable. Have a great weekend

5 and above.

A fine score. Have a great weekend

6 and above.

A fine score. Have a great weekend

7 and above.

A superb score. Have a great weekend

8 and above.

A superb score. Have a great weekend

9 and above.

A superb score. Have a great weekend

0 and above.

Oh dear. Have a great weekend

10 and above.

You absolute legend. Have a great weekend

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Red-card celebrations, Cricket World Cup finals and British GP belters | Classic YouTube
Red-card celebrations, Cricket World Cup finals and British GP belters | Classic YouTube

This week’s roundup also features errant Wimbledon sprinklers, Netball World Cups and table tennis action

1) It’s the British Grand Prix this weekend, which gives us an excuse to raid the archives for some classic races from Silverstone and elsewhere down the years. Let’s start with the race’s first staging at Aintree, when Stirling Moss won it for the first time, and then relive the incident-packed 1976 race at Brands Hatch, when James Hunt’s victory over Niki Lauda was overturned on appeal and the race awarded to the Austrian. The 1987 edition saw Nigel Mansell sensationally overhaul Nelson Piquet at the last to win, and 1995’s featured an infamous crash between championship rivals Damon Hill and Michael Schumacher as Johnny Herbert took a surprise win. While in 2008, Lewis Hamilton underlined his promise with a magnificent victory in the wet and five years later a thrilling race was won by Nico Rosberg.

2) Fancy a pointless mud-diving goal celebration? We got ’em. Still, at least no one was sent off for their exuberance. Here’s 10 who were, including Edinson Cavani for a sniper impersonation, Carlos Tevez for a topless chicken dance, a couple of foolhardy strips and, our favourite, Medi Dresevic running into the stands and applauding himself for scoring.

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Which footballers have also played tennis to a professional level? | The Knowledge
Which footballers have also played tennis to a professional level? | The Knowledge

Plus: fruity surnames and lining up with your club for your country. Mail us or tweet @TheKnowledge_GU

“Any professional tennis players that played as professional footballers as well?” tweets Jack Chesterman.

James Clarke raises his hand. “Michael Boulding played professional tennis until the age of 22, peaking at No 1,119 in the world,” he writes. “He went on to sign for Aston Villa a couple of years after retiring, but only made one appearance, and then floated around the lower tiers of the Football League for a while.

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The Recap: sign up for the best of the Guardian's sport coverage
The Recap: sign up for the best of the Guardian's sport coverage

With the best of our sports journalism from the past seven days and a heads-up on the weekend’s action, you won’t miss a thing

Let our team of editors be your guide to the best of the Guardian’s award-winning sport coverage from the past week. We’ll email you the stand-out features and interviews, insightful analysis and highlights from the archive, plus films, podcasts, galleries and more – all arriving in your inbox at 12pm every Friday. And we’ll tee you up for the weekend and let you know our live coverage plans so you won’t miss a thing.

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Tactical toilet breaks and apple on willow: what free-to-air cricket could inspire | Max Rushden
Tactical toilet breaks and apple on willow: what free-to-air cricket could inspire | Max Rushden

Putting the Cricket World Cup final on free-to-air TV could just be a one-off, but what if it was the start of something more?

In the summer of ’93, everyone at my school became a leg-spinner. We’d never seen leg-spin before Shane Warne arrived. Not that we could remember.

No one could do it – ball after ball just looping on to the top of the low‑hanging cricket net – batsmen waddling halfway down the green matting, jumping and trying to hit the ball back to the bowler, hopefully with enough power to do it in one go. We were hopeless, but we were inspired by what we saw on TV.

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Women’s World Cup captured public’s imagination despite Fifa’s worst efforts | Marina Hyde
Women’s World Cup captured public’s imagination despite Fifa’s worst efforts | Marina Hyde

Patronising scheduling set it up to fail but players used their platform to highlight how the governing body lets them down

Gianni Infantino is one of those intensely political people who believe that as far as everyone else is concerned, there is no place for politics in football. It was just last year – at some grimly political press conference in Iran, naturally – that the Fifa president announced: “It’s very clear that politics should stay out of football and football should stay out of politics.” Is it? If so, the conclusion of the Women’s World Cup on Sunday suggests it is time to ask Infantino how that one’s working out for him.

So much of the previous month’s tournament had felt exuberantly political, from the delicious insolence of Megan Rapinoe in pre-emptively declining any invitation to Trump’s White House, to the boos and chants of “equal pay” that greeted Infantino’s own arrival on the pitch after the final, right down to the US players running over to the stands to kiss their wives and girlfriends in the hour of maximum-ratings triumph. I know this is a moment at which we have to talk about the potential to “grow the game”. So let me say that the last of those spectacles in particular served as a reminder of how far the men’s game has to grow in this department. Let’s hope it manages to ease itself into the late 20th century at some point over the next decade, so that maybe – by the year 2086 or something – we might one day even see a gay male player feel remotely able to do the same.

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